Angkor's Children

A Drop in the Bucket

Reviews

I had the opportunity to watch A Drop in the Bucket while serving as a juror for the 2009 FILManthropy Festival in Hollywood. I felt that Lauren Shaw’s film was in keeping with the festival’s objective of raising awareness of otherwise unknown topics in order to help make the world a better place. Not only did it highlight a forgotten, if not entirely unknown, problem in Cambodia, but it demonstrated how giving can be far more than a dubiously effective, one-time act. It showed that philanthropy can establish sustainable, replicative change for the better and as a tool, it proved that film can, indeed, inspire audiences to embrace the act of selfless contribution.

Richard Castro
Cinema Libre Studio

Access to fresh, clean water is something the developed world takes for granted. “A Drop in the Bucket” provides a wake up call to the world about the need for all people to have access to water and the impact it makes on their lives.

Michelle Harris
Host- Alive & Well

Lauren Shaw’s “A Drop In The Bucket” proves that great waterfalls of change can and must start with one drop of water. This compelling documentary embodies The FILManthropy Festival’s mission of using film as a medium to help make the world a better place. We are extremely proud to have this film as the festival’s premiere winner of the awards for Best Short Film and Audience Favorite Film.

Jodi Fung
FILManthropy Festival Founder and Director

Lauren Shaw’s work is distinguished by her empathy and the dedication and passion which she brings to her subjects. Using her camera as an extension of herself, she records stories that need to be told. Her latest work, A Drop in the Bucket derives from her personal involvement with the clean water crisis in Cambodia. Her still photography and documentary film bring this compelling story to our attention in ways that deepen our understanding and engagement.

Suzette McAvoy